• Hola Invitado

    Hasta el 15 de diciembre, comienza la recepción de fotos para el último "Mi Foto Anónima" del 2018
    PRESTEN ATENCIÓN QUE HEMOS MODIFICADO LAS REGLAS DEL JUEGO
    ¡ Finalizado el de diciembre ya se viene elegir la mejor foto del 2018, envíanos tu foto !

    Vean las nuevas reglas para "Mi Foto Anónima"

24 Tips para tomar fotos de Shows aéreos

Walyx

Colaborador
Mensajes
6.870
Gustó a
1.506
Puntos
113
Ciudad, Barrio o Pueblo
San Nicolas
#1
Estimados, les dejo estos 24 Tips que publicaron en B&H

https://www.bhphotovideo.com/explor...ora&utm_term=24-tips-how-photograph-air-shows


24 Tips on How to Photograph Air Shows
By Todd Vorenkamp |
1 week ago
2139776911716

Airplanes and helicopters are very cool, and an air show offers a collection of cool aircraft. And, if you are like me, you want to not only take a ton of photos at air shows, you will want to come away with a bunch of “keepers.”

Photographs © Todd Vorenkamp


A USAF Boeing F-15E Strike Eagle in afterburner
1. Planning
Air shows are fun for everyone, and, if you just want to go to see cool aircraft on the ground and in the air, not too much planning is needed. The basics, for everyone: Bring a hat, sunglasses, sunscreen, and stay hydrated!


A United Airlines Boeing 747-400 makes a high-speed pass over the Golden Gate Bridge.
2. Scouting
For the photographer, it pays to do some scouting, if possible. Depending on the air show, the performers will do a practice flight on Thursdays, during which the pilots get familiar with the airspace. Friday will be a dress rehearsal. Saturday and Sunday will be the actual shows. Depending on the venue, you may be able to preview the show by viewing the Thursday and Friday action. This allows you to become familiar with the performers and their routines. Take photos and take mental notes. It’s fun to be surprised by a jet team’s “sneak passes,” but it is even cooler to know it’s coming and have your camera pointed in the right direction!


The US Navy Blue Angels
3. No Trespassing
Be it at a civilian airport or a military base, an air show is not the time you want to be hopping fences, testing security, or going around roped-off areas in the name of getting a great photograph. It is never cool to trespass, and doing it at an air show can endanger yourself, the performers, and get you in a lot of trouble.


Air shows can be all about details.
4. Take it All in
The performances at an air show are incredible to watch, but be sure to enjoy all the aircraft on exhibit on the flight line. And photograph them! A snapshot of a parked “helo” or warbird might just be a snapshot, but try to study the light and the angles and look for creative and engaging photographs. Air shows are crowded. Don’t be afraid to include the crowd in your photos to help give the images a sense of place and activity.


Here come the Marines! Here comes Fat Albert! There goes Alcatraz Island!
5. Location: Show Center
The default best place to watch and photograph an air show is at show center, as close to the flight line as possible. The problem? Everyone else knows this! Sometimes you should pay to sit at show center and, often, it is a mass of people. In the crowd, you’ll likely be surrounded by tall people who love to feature their heads and hats in your photos. If you can shoot there, great, but know there are alternatives.


A US Navy Boeing F/A-18F Super Hornet approaches supersonic speeds.
6. Location: The Ends
As you work toward either end of the flight line, the crowds will thin out and you will have more room to work. Also, positioning yourself in these areas can afford you unique views that are not seen at show center, because aircraft may be turning directly overhead before or following their passes down the flight line. Here is where some scouting during the practices may help.


The US Navy SEAL Leapfrog parachute team member
7. Location: Bleachers
Bleachers afford an elevated view of the action—a nice thing. However, you might be farther away from the action. It is a tradeoff. Scouting helps here, as well.

Air Show Insider Tip: If you are going to be in the bleachers, try to sit near the top. The air show’s main action happens over the flight line, but if you can see behind you, you will catch another show in the distance. For anyone who has flown formation flights in aircraft, one of the most challenging and dynamic maneuvers is the “breakup and rendezvous.” Aircraft break formation and then must rejoin the formation. This flying involves intense and dynamic maneuvers that are almost more difficult than what you see in front of you at an air show. It will likely be too far away to photograph, but sitting high in the bleachers can show you this behind-the-scenes action and piloting skill during respites between show center passes.


The US Navy Blue Angels were forced into their “low show.” But here, the clouds and overall texture of the sky make for a dramatic effect.
 

Walyx

Colaborador
Mensajes
6.870
Gustó a
1.506
Puntos
113
Ciudad, Barrio o Pueblo
San Nicolas
#2
8. Weather
Clouds are your friends at air shows, as long as they are not low enough that they cancel the shows. Bald skies are nice, but boring for photos. Some show teams may perform their “low show” if the ceilings are too low. The “low show” is decidedly less exciting to watch, but it can be way better to photograph due to the backdrops and lighting, so embrace it!



Who put that monolight there?

9. Light
Photography is all about the light. You can request that the Blue Angels or Thunderbirds fly during the “golden hour,” but that probably won’t happen. Air shows happen when the light is usually the worst, but if you can come early, or stay late, you might be able to get some great shots of the static aircraft on display.



USAF Boeing F-15E Strike Eagle turns hard.

10. Camera
You can use any kind of camera to take great air show pictures. But, when catching the action of jets streaking overhead at 500 miles per hour, the modern DSLR camera is going to give you your best chance of capturing a great image, due to its autofocus capabilities and speed. However, you can still make compelling images with a point-and-shoot or mirrorless camera.



A clean US Navy Boeing F/A-18F Super Hornet

11. Long Lens
You should get as close as you can to the action. Many times, the best photos are the ones in which the aircraft fill (or even overfill) the frame. You will want to bring the longest telephoto lens you feel comfortable carrying around all day long. I used to shoot air shows with zooms that went to 200mm and even used teleconverters, but then settled on a 300mm f/4 lens for the combination of focal length and portability. I haven’t looked back since.



A Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-15 Fagot

12. Wide Lens
On the ground, you will want a normal or wide-angle lens to capture aircraft up close. These lenses will also come in handy when and if you want to capture more dramatic wide shots of the sky being painted with smoke trails from the performers. These wide views can be a welcome and artistic change from the tighter action shots of the telephoto lens.



Don’t forget the helicopters... or cool helo pilots!

13. Two Bodies
Air show action can be fast and furious. If you have the means, you might want to carry two bodies—one with your telephoto and one with the wider lens. You can switch cameras much faster than you can switch lenses and keep pace with the action. If you photograph air shows with one body, inevitably, your wide-angle lens will be on the camera when you need the telephoto, and vice versa.



The Canadian Snowbirds in a loop

14. Ditch the Monopod
Some folks recommend a monopod for the big telephotos at air shows. I tried a monopod once. Once. When shooting things all around me and straight up, the monopod was a huge hindrance. I don’t recommend it for air shows unless you are shooting a gigantic lens and know generally where you need it to be pointed. A gimbal head on a tripod might be a solution, but you limit your mobility with a heavy setup like this.



Yankin’ and bankin’

15. Image Stabilization
I had an early lens with image stabilization. “Eureka!” I thought. This was the key to perfectly sharp air show photos. Click, click, click, at an amazing air show in Virginia. I got home, excited to see the photos on the big screen. Almost all of them were blurry. The stabilization system could not keep up with my panning. I now turn IS/VR/OIS off when shooting air shows and have lost sleep over those photos. The systems have improved dramatically since then, but I learned my lesson and won’t go back to using it.



Not your everyday air show guest

16. Raw versus JPEG
In general, I shoot raw. At an air show, during the performances, I take a lot of photos. Therefore, I shoot JPEG so that I can get the largest number of images on each card and help the camera to avoid buffering issues if I ask it to save too much data at once after a long burst of images.



Escape from Alcatraz... to Canada!
 

Walyx

Colaborador
Mensajes
6.870
Gustó a
1.506
Puntos
113
Ciudad, Barrio o Pueblo
San Nicolas
#3
17. Memory
There are few things worse for the air show photographer than having your head down, trying to delete images from a card so that you can take more photos while you miss aircraft fly overhead. Bring lots of memory cards. And then bring more.



Diamond formation

18. Spotter
If you have a non-photographing partner, they can help you time your shots and help spot the action. When Blue Angels solos were flying in opposition, my brother would give me a countdown to their pass at show center. I could pan with one airplane and start shooting as they got near. Also, it is fun to look at your LCD and say, “Nailed it!” and high-five someone.



Why am I suddenly wanting frozen pizza?

19. Camera Settings: Autofocus
It’s difficult to keep pace with autofocus technology these days but, unless you are determined to put all of the aircraft on Rule of Thirds lines, it’s best to use the center autofocus point (or points) and use continuous autofocus.



Ready... break!

20. Camera Settings: Metering
I generally shoot in center-weighted metering mode unless I want a specific look to a shot. With a bright sky and relatively darker aircraft, you can run the risk of washing out the sky or silhouetting the planes as the camera tries to balance between large bright areas and small dark ones. Check your shots as you shoot, and adjust as needed.



“He’s coming right at us!” – Controller Steve McCroskey, in Airplane!

21. Camera Settings: Motor Drive
Continuous high, friend. Air shows are as action-packed as action gets. Release the shutter and let the camera click-click-click-click until the action ends. Check your shots. Rinse. Repeat.



Turnin’ and burnin’

22. Camera Settings: Shooting/Exposure Mode
In general, when aircraft are overhead, you want the highest shutter speed possible (caveat in the next section). You might think that demands using Shutter Priority mode and dialing-in a fast shutter speed. That can work, but what I do is set my camera to Aperture Priority mode at f/4 to f/8 (depending on how bright it is). This way, the camera will always give me the fastest shutter speed possible for a given aperture and this is very helpful as you pan across a sky where the brightness changes. This also is the range where most lenses give peak performance, as far as optical quality and sharpness.



Don’t forget the helo pilots.

23. Camera Settings: Shutter Speed
As I just mentioned, you’ll likely want to shoot with the fastest shutter speed available for the ambient light levels and the aperture you are choosing. The caveat is when it comes to rotorcraft and propeller-driven aircraft. If you shoot them at very high shutter speeds, you will freeze the rotors and propellers and it will appear that you are photographing a detailed plastic model floating in midair. Try shutter speeds of 1/125 or slower, to ensure you get some dynamic blur of the spinning parts!



Pulling Gs

24. Enjoy the Show
Last, but not least, don’t forget to just watch and enjoy the air show. Seeing the performances through your eyes and not your viewfinder is an awesome experience. If you can go on multiple days, you might want to leave the camera behind for one day so that you can just relax and enjoy the spectacle.



Air shows are beautiful.

What other air show tips do you have that you can share with your fellow B&H Explora readers? Tell us in the Comments section, below!












Saludos,

Walter
 

Trifido

Colaborador
Mensajes
2.265
Gustó a
1.167
Puntos
113
Pais
Argentina
Provincia
Capital Federal C.A.B.A.
Ciudad, Barrio o Pueblo
Flores
#4
Ahora me lo dicen! XD
 

Chalten

Miembro del equipo
Administrador
Mensajes
9.189
Gustó a
1.030
Puntos
113
Pais
Argentina
Provincia
Capital Federal C.A.B.A.
Ciudad, Barrio o Pueblo
V.Pueyrredón
#6

Trifido

Colaborador
Mensajes
2.265
Gustó a
1.167
Puntos
113
Pais
Argentina
Provincia
Capital Federal C.A.B.A.
Ciudad, Barrio o Pueblo
Flores
#8
Si me dan algo de tiempo lo traduzco, pero ando medio complicado.
 

Trifido

Colaborador
Mensajes
2.265
Gustó a
1.167
Puntos
113
Pais
Argentina
Provincia
Capital Federal C.A.B.A.
Ciudad, Barrio o Pueblo
Flores
#9
24 recomendaciones acerca de como foTografiar shows aéreos.
Las aeronaves y helicópteros son muy copados (*cool), y los shows aéreos ofrecen una colección muy copada de aeronaves.
Y, si usted es como yo, usted querrá no sólo tomar toneladas de fotografías en los show aéreos, usted querrá volver con una colección de fotos buenas (*keepers)

1. Planear
Los shows aéreos son divertidos para todos, y, si Ud. solo quiere ir a ver aeronaves copadas en el suelo y en el aire, no se precisa mucho planeamiento. Lo básico, para todos: Traiga sombrero, anteojos, pantalla solar y mantengase hidratado!

2. Explorar
Para el fotógrafo, paga realizar algo de exploración, si es posible. Dependiendo del show aéreo, los pilotos realizarán vuelos de práctica los jueves, durante los cuales se familiarizarán con el espacio aéreo. El viernes se realiza el ensayo completo. Sábado y domingo se realizan los shows propiamente dichos.
Dependiendo del lugar, puede que sea capaz de tener una vista previa del show observando la acción el jueves y viernes. Esto le permitirá familiarizarse con los pilotos y sus rutinas.
Tome fotografías y notas mentales. Es divertido sorprenderse con los pasajes rasantes de los jets, pero es aún mas copado saber que están viniendo y tener la cámara apuntando en la dirección correcta.

3. No traspasar los límites
Sea un aeropuerto civil o una base militar, un show aéreo no es el momento donde usted quiere estar saltando vallados, probando la seguridad, o moviendose por zonas restringidas en nombre de obtener una buena fotografía. Nunca es copado traspasar los límites, y hacerlo en un show aéreo puede ponerlo en riesgo a Ud, a los pilotos y ponerlo a Ud. en un monton de problemas.

4. Tómelo todo
Las exhibiciones en un show aéreo son increíbles de ver, pero asegúrese de disfrutar de todos los aviones o exhibiciones junto a la pista. Y fotografíelos. Una toma de un helicóptero aparcado o de un avión de combate (*warbird) puede que solo sea una foto, pero procure estudiar la luz y los ángulos y busque fotografías creativas y atractivas. los shows aéreos suelen estar llenos de gente. No tema incluír la multitud en sus fotos para dar a sus imágenes un sentido de la ubicación y actividad.

5. Ubicación: Centro del show
El mejor lugar por definición para ver y fotografiar un show aéreo es en el centro mismo, lo mas cerca de la línea de vuelo que sea posible. El problema? Todos los demás lo saben! A veces se cobra la ubicación en el centro y, a menudo, es una masa de gente. En la multitud es probable que esté rodeado por gente alta que adora mostrar sus cabezas y sombreros en tus fotos (Nota del traductor: No conozco a nadie que sea capaz de hacer algo así). Si puede fotografiar ahí, bárbaro, pero sepa que hay alternativas.

6. Ubicación: Los extremos
A medida que trabaje hacia cualquiera de los extremos de la pista, las multitudes se irán diluyendo y tendrá mas espacio para trabajar. Además ubicándose en esas áreas podrá disponer de vistas únicas que no se ven en el centro del show, poque las aeronaves pueden estar girando directamente sobre su cabeza antes o después de sus pasadas por la pista. Aqui es cuando la exploración previa durante las prácticas puede ser de ayuda.

7. Ubicación: Las gradas
Las gradas brindan una vista elevada de la acción -lo cual es algo bueno. Sin embargo, puede quedar alejado de la acción. Es un compromiso entre estar cerca o estar elevado. Explorar ayuda aqui también.
Consejo de alguien que esta en los shows aéreos: Si va a estar en las gradas, procure estar cerca de lo mas alto. La acción principal sucede sobre la pista, pero si consigue ver hacia atrás, puede que capte otro show a la distancia. Para cualquiera que haya volado aeronaves en formación, una de las maniobra smas dinámicas y desafiantes es la "partida y reencuentro" (*breakup and rendezvous). Las aeronaves rompen la formación y luego deben unirse nuevamente a ella. Esta etapa del vuelo comprende maniobras muy intensas y dinámicas que son casi mas complicadas que lo que se ve frente a usted en el show aéreo. Es posible que estén muy alejados para fotografiarlos, pero sentado en las gradas altas puede permitirle ver esta acción detrás de escena y las habilidades de pilotaje durante intervalos entre pasadas en la pista

8. Clima
Las nubes son sus amigas en los shows aéreos, siempre que no haya un cielo muy bajo y cancelen el show. Los cielos pelados son agradables, pero aburridos para las fotografías. Algunos equipos de exhibición pueden realizar su "show bajo" si el techo de nubes es bajo. El show bajo es decididamente menos espectacular para ver pero puede ser muycho mejor para fotografiar gracias al fondo y la luz, asi que, aprovéchelo"

9. Luz
La fotografía trata acerca de la luz. Puede pedirle a los blue angels o los thunderbirds (N. del T. Equipos acrobáticos de la fuerza aérea y la marina de EEUU) que realizen su show durante la "hora dorada", pero eso probablemente no sucederá. Los shows aéreos se dan en las horas de peor luz, pero si puede llegar temprano, o quedarse tarde, puede que obtenga excelentes tomas de las aeronaves en exhibición estática

10. Cámara
Puede utilizar cualquier cámara para tomabr excelentes fotos de un show aéreo. Pero, cuando capture la acción de jets pasando a 800 Km/h, una cámara DSLR moderna le dará la mejor chance de conseguir buenas imágenes, gracias a sus capacidades de autofoco y velocidad.
Sin embargo, esto no implica que no pueda obtener excelentes imágenes con una cámara pocket o mirrorless.

11. Lentes largos.
Usted debería estar lo mas cerca que pueda de la acción. Muchas veces, las mejores fotos son aquellas en las que el aeroplano llena (o incluso rebalsa) el encuadre. Va a querer llevar el lente telefoto mas largo que sienta cómodo llevar todo el día. Solía fotografiar shows aéreos con zooms que iban hasta los 200mm e incluso utilicé teleconversores, pero finalmente me decidí por un 300mm f/4 por la combinación de longitud focal y portabilidad. No me arrepentí desde que lo hice.

12. Angulares
En tierra va a querer un lente normal o angular para capturar las aeronaves desde cerca. Estos lentes también serán útiles cuando y si desea capturar tomas amplias mas dramáticas del cielo pintado con trazas de humo de los pilotos. Estas vistas amplias pueden ser un cambio artístico bienvenido con respecto a las tomas mas ajustadas del telefoto.

13. Dos cuerpos de cámara.
La acción en los shows aéreos puede ser rápida y furiosa. Si tiene los medios, puede que Ud. quiera llevar dos cuerpos - Uno con el telefoto y el otro con el angular. Es mucho mas fácil cambiar cámaras que lentes, y mantenerse a tiro con la acción. Si fotografía shows aéreos con un único cuerpo, ievitablemente se encontrará con que tiene el angular cuando precisa el teklefoto y viceversa.

14. Descarte el monopié
Hay quienes recomiendan un monopié para los telefotos grandes en los shows aéreos. Yo probé utilizar un monopié una vez. Una. Cuando fotografío cosas a mi alrededor y directo hacia arriba, el monopié era un gran estorbo. No lo recomiendo para shows aéreos a menos que esté utilizando un lente gigantesco y tenga idea de hacia adonde tiene que apuntarlo. Un cabezal de tipo gimbal en un trípode puede ser una solución, pero esto limita su mobilidad.

15. Estabilización de imagen (IS)
Tuve uno de los primeros lentes con estabilizador de imagen (IS). Eureka! pensé. Esta es la clave para perfectas fotos de shows aéreos. Click, click, click en un maravilloso show en Virginia. llegué a casa, entusiasmado por ver las fotos en la pantalla grande. Prácticamente todas eran borrosas. Sl sistema de estabilización no estaba a la altura de mi barrido. Ahora apago el sistema IS/VR/OIS cuando fotografío shows aéreos y y pierdo el sueño acerca de esas fotos. El sistema ha mejorado muchísimo desde entonces, pero aprendí mi lección y no volveré a usarlo.

16. Raw versus JPEG
En general, disparo en RAW. En un show aéreo, durante las exhibiciones, tomo muchas fotos. Por lo tanto, disparo en JPEG de manera de poder tener la mayor cantidad de fotos en cada tarjeta y evitar los problemas de buffering por intentar grabar demasiados datos de una vez luego de una larga ráfaga de imágenes

17. Memoria
Hay pocas cosas peores para el fotógrafo de shows aéreos que mantener la cabeza abajo, tratando de nborrar imágenes de una tarjeta de modo de poder tomar mas fotografías mientras te perdees las aeronaves sobrevolando. Lleve montones de tarjetas de memoria. Y agregue un par mas por las dudas.

18. Observador (*Spotter)
Si tiene un compañero que no esté fotografiando, puede ayudarlo con us fotografías observando la acción. Cuando los solos de los Blue Angels volaban en oposición, mi hermanos me daba una cuenta regresiva de su pasaje por el centrol. Podria realizar un paneo de una de las aeronaves y comenzar a disparar a medida que se acercaban. Además esta bueno eso de mirar la pantalla y decir "lo tengo" y poder chocar los cinco con alguien.

19. Seteos de cámara: Autofoco
Es dificil mantener el paso de las tecnologias de autofoco hoy en día, pero a menos que usted esté determinado a colocar todas las aeronaves en las lineas de la regla de tercios, lo mejor es utilizar el/los punto/s central/es del autofoco y usar AF Continuo.
 

Trifido

Colaborador
Mensajes
2.265
Gustó a
1.167
Puntos
113
Pais
Argentina
Provincia
Capital Federal C.A.B.A.
Ciudad, Barrio o Pueblo
Flores
#10
20. Seteos de cámara: Medición
Generlamente saco en modo poderado central (center weighed) a menos que quiera un estilo específico para una fotografía determinada. Con un cielo brillante y un avión relativamente mas oscuro, puedes correr el riesgo de quemar el cielo u obtener una silueta del avión mientras a camara intenta balancear entre enormes áreas brillantes y pequeñas zonas oscuras. Chequee las tomas mientras dispara, y ajuste según sea necesario.

21. Seteos de cámara: Motor drive
Ráfaga contínua de alta velocidad (Continuous high), mi amigo. Los shows aéreos están llenos de acción de alta velocidad. Presione el obturador y deje que la cámara dispare click-click-click hasta que la acción termina. Chequee las fotos. Enjuague. Repita.

22. Seteos de cámara: Modo de exposición/Disparo
En general, cuando las aeronaves estan ssobvrevolandonos justo encima, vas a desear la maxima velocidad de obturación posible (advertencia en la proxima sección). Usted puede pensar que esto demanda la utilizacion de prioridad e obturador (shutter piority) y seleccionar una velocidad alta de obturación. Esto puede servir, pero lo que yo hago es es setear mi cámara en prioridad de apertura (Aperture priority) a f/4 o f/8 (dependiendo de las condiciones de luz). De este modo, la cámara siempre me dará la máxima velocidad posible para una apertura determinada y esto es muy útil a medida que se barre el cielo donde la cantidad de luz es cambiante. Este es también el rango donde la mayoría de los lentes brindan un desempeño óptimo , en lo que se refuere a cualidades ópticas y definición.

23. Seteos de cámara: Velocidad de disparo
Como mencioné antes, probablemente desee disparar con la máxima velocidad de obturación disponible para los niveles de luz ambiente y apertura seleccionada. La contra viene cuando deseamos fotografiar aeronaves a hélice o de rotor, como los helicópteros. Si Ud. realiza tomas a alta velocidad de obturador, congelará el movimiento de las hélices o rotores y parecerá que está fotografiando un modelo plástico muy detallado flotando en medio del aire. Pruebe velocidades menores, del orden de 1/125 o menos, para asegurarse de obtener un poco de borroneado dinámico en las partes que giran.

24. Disfrute el Show
Last, but not least, don’t forget to just watch and enjoy the air show. Seeing the performances through your eyes and not your viewfinder is an awesome experience. If you can go on multiple days, you might want to leave the camera behind for one day so that you can just relax and enjoy the spectacle.
Por último, pero no por ello menos importante, no olvide observar y disfrutar el show. Ver a los pilotos a través de sus ojos y no por el visor es una hermosa experiencia. Si puede ir mas de un día al show, quizás quiera dejarse la cámara guardada una de las fechas para simplemente relajarse y disfrutar el espectáculo.


Listo, espero no tener demasiados errores, que lo traduje a las chapas y no usé ni corrector ortográfico.
Saludos.
 
Última edición:

Walyx

Colaborador
Mensajes
6.870
Gustó a
1.506
Puntos
113
Ciudad, Barrio o Pueblo
San Nicolas
#11
Buenisimo!
Muchas gracias Fernando! :)
Saludos,

Walter
 

Chalten

Miembro del equipo
Administrador
Mensajes
9.189
Gustó a
1.030
Puntos
113
Pais
Argentina
Provincia
Capital Federal C.A.B.A.
Ciudad, Barrio o Pueblo
V.Pueyrredón
#12
Genial!!! Gracias Fernando !!!

A ver cuánto podemos aplicar el sábado :)
 

Anuncio

Ganador Foto anónima

Conectados

Arriba